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Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Major in International Relations and Global Affairs

The International Relations and Global Affairs (IRGA) is a new program offered by the Social Science Division. IRGA prepares students for a wide variety of careers in public and private sectors, international organizations and NGOs. Building on existing Divisional and College strengths, it provides students with the skills and knowledge essential for success in a competitive, interdependent and rapidly-changing 21st century. It supports the goal, articulated in the Thailand 4.0 program, of “International awareness and orientation: harnessing globalization.” Students will engage in an interdisciplinary curriculum which emphasizes both academic and a skills-based approach to learning.

International Relations and Global Affairs Curriculum Structure

Required Courses

International Relations and Global Affairs

Elective Courses

International Relations and World Politics Concentration

Elective Courses

Global Affairs: Asia and Beyond Concentration

Thesis / Internship

Senior Thesis or Internship for Final Trimester

Required Courses in the International Relations and Global Affairs Program

This course is a general introduction to International Relations (IR). It covers a wide variety of topics, from the development of the study of international relations, to contemporary concerns. It aims to introduce the student to central theories and concepts of the study of IR, and introduce important events in IR such as conflict, the changing nature of sovereignty, and new international rules. The course starts with a foundation in theories of IR, followed by a study of the principle organizations and issues such as war and the economy. Finally, it examines a range of contemporary issues in IR (such as security, humanitarianism, and the environment). There will be some practical elements to expose students to the activities of IR professionals who work in fields such as policy analysis, diplomacy, international and transnational organizations, security, and intelligence. The course material is primarily academic articles, however, films and other relevant media are used for instruction.

The principles and practice of international relations, with particular reference to the modern world; the bases of international power and interstate competition; inequalities among states, including domination and colonialism; war and conflict resolution among great powers; the role of trade, defence policies, and control over scarce resources; the involvement of non-state players, including international organizations and special interest groups; international issues concerning the treatment of minority groups, human rights, the use of the environment, international crime, and terrorism. Students will learn to discuss; analyze; assess international structures; methods; interactions of actors in international politics.

This lecture-based course seeks to explore and compare various forms of political systems in theory, principle and practice. Most importantly, the course main goal is to probe different political systems such as in democracies, communism, monarchy, military dictatorship, and other systems in an analytical and comparative manner. Furthermore, understanding forms of representation, party political systems, elections and decision making in the context of the different systems. The working of the executive, legislative and judicial aspect of government and their inter-relationship.

Comparative Political Systems course introduces students to an extraordinary breadth of content and depth of contextualization. This course aims to give a practical examination of modern day political systems. The focus shall be on political structures, historical context, political culture, legal constructs and how these components have coalesced into contemporary frameworks that govern nation state behavior internally and externally. Students will be required to apply theories of political organization, legal mechanisms and social theory in a comparative fashion. Various nation states will be analyzed contrasting developed and developing nation political structures and value systems in order to derive a broad understanding of contemporary politics in the modern world.

Various forms of political systems, both in theory, principle, and practice; political systems in stateless societies, traditional kingdoms and empires, absolutist states, democracies, and modern “authoritarian” and militaristic states; various forms of representation, party-political systems, elections, and decision-making; the working of the executive, legislative, and judicial aspects of government and their interrelationships. Students will understand; examine; assess various forms of political systems, both in theory, principle and practice.

This course covers the so-called long nineteenth century, beginning around 1750 and ending with the start of the First World War in 1914. In this period, the modern world emerges. The course introduces students to the systematic study of change over time from a comparative and global perspective. In particular, it examines in demographic issues, the Industrial Revolution in the West, political revolutions and the emergence of nationalism across the globe, and nineteenth-century imperialism. Students will examine a range of primary sources from the period and develop skills in the critical analysis of texts and images.

Selected aspects of world history from c.1763 to 1914; the Industrial Revolutions and the growth of the world economy; the American and French Revolutions; Latin American independence and development; political developments in Europe and the United States: representative government, the abolition of slavery, nationalism, socialism, women’s rights; imperialism and responses to it; the emergence of Japan; wars and warfare; social, scientific, medical and technological developments. Students will discuss; assess; examine a range of primary sources from the period and develop skills in the critical analysis of texts and images.

This course covers the twentieth century, running from the outbreak of the First World War to the 9/11 terrorist attack on the United States. During this time, key features and institutions of the modern world related to globalization and international governance continued to develop. Particular attention is paid to the two world wars and the intervening period, the emergence of an international order dominated by two superpowers and the ensuing Cold War, decolonization in Asia and Africa, and the socio-economic transformations of societies across the globe resulting from medical and technological developments such as new contraceptive methods and computing. The course develops the historical skills, such as identifying change over time and interpreting primary sources, introduced in ICIR 201 The Formation of the Modern World.

A short introduction to selected aspects of world history since World War II. The USA and the USSR as superpowers. The Cold War. The UN system. Decolonialization and the ‘Third World’. Major regional powers. The Soviet collapse and its repercussions. Regional conflicts in the Middle East, South Asia, and the Balkans. Economic, technological and scientific developments. The great consumer boom. OPEC and oil prices. The World Bank and IMF. The EU and other economic regionalisms. World poverty. New political movements: Civil Rights, feminism, radical Islam. Ethnic conflicts and nationalism. Students will discuss; examine; assess; identify changes over time and interpreting primary sources, introduced in ICIR 201 The Formation of the Modern World.

This course consists of a historical survey of the major paradigms in the Social Sciences (History, Political Science, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, Psychology) during the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the political aspects of such areas of activity as economics, sociology, etc. Students will understand; analyze; assess schools and paradigms of political thought. They should also be able to understand the relationship between politics, economics and social phenomena. The primary aim is to introduce students to foundational political and social theories, and to enable them to apply these to contemporary problems.

This course examines major perspectives on International Relations such as Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism and Critical Theory. Students will apply different conceptual frameworks to a range of issues in global politics and reflect on the advantages and disadvantages of particular perspectives. Students will examine a range of issues in international relations such as terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, human rights, trade, investment and finance and apply multiple theoretical perspectives to analyze these issues.

This course exposes students to the basic tenets of conflict studies, by comparing and contrasting various concepts and definitions of war, conflict, violence and peace. War and violence are discussed both in historical perspective and in regard to contemporary conflict geographies. Trends, types and tendencies of contemporary conflict are examined and illustrated through a number of relevant case studies. The course focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to collective violence, demonstrating the merits of a holistic understanding of human aggression for the analysis of conflict and violence. Students will scrutinize the correlation between war and politics, interpret the nexus of violence and identity, and discuss the issue of war crimes and atrocities. Modalities of peace making and peace building are examined and contrasted, leading to a critical discussion of the challenges of trauma and reconciliation in post-conflict societies.

The impact of war upon society and the state; social and political consequences of war; the mobilization of society in times of war; the status of human rights and freedom in times and places of war; politics and war; patterns of military organization; the possible social and political role of the military. Students will describe; explain; analyze; assess major approaches to conflict, war and peace in comparative global perspective.

This course outlines the evolution of Thai foreign policy from the nineteenth century to the present day. It will enable students to develop their understanding of the rationale and goals behind the Thai foreign policy-making process and evaluate the success of those policies.

Students will examine and evaluate a selected case study related to Thai foreign policy. The influence of geopolitics on Thailand’s foreign policy; pre-modern interstate relations and concepts in Southeast Asia and their continuing influence; Siam’s relations with the Western imperial powers in the colonial period; the evolution of Thailand’s foreign policy and relations during the First and Second World Wars; Thailand’s foreign policy during the Cold War, especially its relations with the USA; the formulation and effects of current Thai policies regarding ASEAN, the UN, APEC, and other regional and international organizations; the evolution and impacts of current Thai bilateral relations with China, the Koreas, Japan, and India. Students will discuss the formulation, evolution and results of Thai foreign policy from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day, with a particular focus on analyzing the decision-making process in a selected case study.

This course outlines the major theories and issues in international political economy. It assesses the success and failures of international organizations, particularly those related to political economy. The course explains the bargaining between rich and poor countries. The course discusses the political and economic conditions conducive to the development of cooperative international economic behavior among countries.

It aims to introduce students to issues in international political economy including post-colonialism, IMF and World Bank lending, role of MNC’s, development, global poverty, globalization, development traps, global governance and future trajectories.

The historical development of a world political society and the structures of international diplomacy. War and peace-making between the Great Powers. The Concert of Europe. The League of Nations, the United Nations, and the Cold War. International agreements, treaties, and organizations. The principles of international law. Students will remember; understand; apply; analyze the historical development towards a peaceful world order.

This course is an outline of the major international organizations (IOs) today. It will look at their structure, duties, directions, obligations, and success. The course focuses on the large International Governmental Organizations (IGOs) such as the United Nations as well as Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), and Multinational Corporations (MNCs). Theories concerning IOs will be discussed at the beginning of the course to guide students through the rest of the materials. The various IOs are examined in two ways: firstly, a description of their structure, function, and activities. Secondly, there will be a critical analysis of their role in global politics, the success of their mission, and potential biases or agendas which affect their activities. The course will examine the problems of cooperation in the international system and how institutions are designed and constructed to overcome these problems. Particular emphasis will be placed on students’ ability to think critically, both about the nature of problems that face states as well as development of global governance mechanisms.

The development of international organizations since the 19th century; their nature, function, and purpose; contemporary global and regional international organizations (the United Nations, ILO, WTO, and the IMF; the EU, ASEAN, NAFTA, APEC, etc.); their effectiveness and future. Students will remember; understand; analyze; assess organizations from a comparative perspective.

This course introduces students to the different methods of conducting meaningful research in International Relations and Global Affairs related fields. It aims to introduce students to research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis. The purpose is to help students prepare for advanced level research tasks independently.

An introduction to the scientific method and its use in social science research; examination of research methods, data collection, survey techniques, and hypothesis formation, observations and testing. Students will assess; analyze; evaluate world events; disciplinary research methods in international relations.

A study of ASEAN reveals both progress in the development of a Southeast Asian security community and the numerous impediments that remain to further regional integration. Principal among the latter is the continued importance attached to national governance in the region. Of comparatively recent origin, the national polities of Southeast Asia remain the dominant players in regional affairs. Although regional integration has made significant progress, national sovereignty remains a paramount concern. In this course, we examine the shared trajectories and conflicts that have shaped Southeast Asian states; the growth of ASEAN as a political and economic organization and a range of contemporary regional issues and concerns. Southeast Asia in the context of global politics in the period since World War II. The impact of the Cold War and its ending. The international relations of the Southeast Asian states. ASEAN. Students will assess, analyze; evaluate ASEAN regionalism.

This course provides opportunities for students to explore career options relating to the field of international and global affairs. It aims to equip students with the skills necessary for new graduates to establish a career in the current global employment market, which include, resume and cover letter writing, making networking, interview techniques, and job search strategy.

How to find a job; create a CV; personal branding; prepare; perform effectively for interviews. Explains how to evaluate the application experience. Students will assess; arrange; appraise methods and means to find jobs in a competitive marketplace.

Elective Courses International Relations and Global Affairs

International Relations and World Politics Concentration

This course provides a critical introduction to globalization as a topic of academic investigation and debate. It examines the origins of globalization as well as the factors which have contributed to its acceleration in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.   The consequences and contemporary challenges posed globalization – economic, political and socio-cultural – serve as a focal point for lectures and discussions.

The global structures and transformations of the late twentieth century; the global economy; food supply; population; disease; environment, resources, and pollution; communications; geopolitics; national states, regional, and international organizations; minorities; the role of women; warfare and terrorism; migration and refugees; crime; culture. Students will understand; analyze; assess global structures and transformations in the world.

This course provides students with an understanding and ability to analyze and assess the historical development, principles and practices of democracy. Students will understand essential elements; criticisms, strengths, and weaknesses; alternative systems; social and cultural prerequisites for democracy; possible future developments.

Historical developments; the principles, practices, and processes of democracy; essential elements; criticisms, strengths, and weaknesses; alternative systems; social and cultural prerequisites for democracy; possible future developments. Students will understand; analyze; assess the historical development, principles and practices of democracy.

This course analyzes a number of contemporary global security challenges in relation to violent conflict and regional conflict geographies: How and why do international conflicts appear and develop? The focus of discussions is on a number of common security challenges, from arms proliferation to environmental and resource-related risks. Different mechanisms for the prevention, management and resolution of violent conflicts are explored and discussed. After an introduction into the concept of human security and global security challenges, students will work on group projects discussing selected case studies. Conflicts that could be covered include civil wars, international wars and domestic and international terrorism. Through examining these case studies, students will acquire an understanding of explicit and implicit conceptualizations as to why conflicts happen as well as why some methods of conflict prevention and resolution are more effective than others.

Recent developments of warfare with particular reference to the contemporary world; the development of armed forces and innovations in weaponry, tactics and strategy; social and economic costs of warfare; combat and combatants; provisioning and planning; the use of reporting and propaganda in support of warfare; the industrialization of war and the rise of “New Wars”; types of warfare and security challenges in the contemporary world. Students will understand; analyze; examine security challenges; armed conflict in a global perspective.

This course examines the social and political impact of global media networks and transnational information flows. It includes an overview history of mass media, with attention being given to technologies, business models and the growth of global information flows. Students also consider the role of mass media in shaping public perceptions and the rise of complex debates surrounding media oversight, regulation and control. The latter half of the course looks at a range of contemporary developments: the promise and consequences of digitalization; the advent of global consumer culture; public diplomacy and transnational advocacy; conflict management and recent concerns over truth decay and the erosion of public culture. The role of global media in the formation of transnational civil society and discursive politics between states will also be examined.

The development of the media as a global socializing force; the creation of a global market place; the information age; the power of the media in society and politics; the new global media culture. Students will understand; analyze; assess the importance of global opinion and discursive politics in shaping debates and policies.

This course introduces students to the history of diplomatic theory and practice. It examines the origins of diplomacy, the changing role and status of diplomats and their conduct, and the frameworks of norms and laws that have governed these in a variety of historical and cultural settings. It examines the evolution of business-to-state and international business relations as well as state-state relations, and compares them. It considers how diplomacy continues to change in a globalized and digital world, and how it might evolve in the future.

The uses of diplomacy and negotiation in resolving political and commercial disputes. Role and status of diplomats and negotiators. The question of political versus commercial issues. State-to-state relations, business-to-state relations, international business-state relations. Conflict generation and diplomatic model solutions. Students will remember; understand; analyze; assess the conceptual foundations in understanding diplomacy.

This course traces the development of organized labour following the Industrial Revolution and the social changes induced by industrialism. Emphasis will be on the problems of capitalism. There is discussion of factory conditions and reform throughout the early labour movement. The social consequences of rapid urbanization and their impact on workers will be examined. Treatment of immigrants and migrant workers both in the early and present industrial societies is of capital importance in this examination. Included in the discussion of migrants will be the legal policies and social treatment of ethnic and racial minorities and of women. Western labor movements and organizations and their consolidation of trade unionism in Britain, labour and union movements in Continental Europe and labour movements in the USA and the British Dominions up to World War I and II are the focus of the first part of the course, Then labour movements worldwide from 1914 to the present day as well as issues of trade union organization, power and influence in the modern world and the impact of migration on the world wide labor condition will be examined. Students will understand; analyze; examine; and evaluate the movement and migration of people globally and their impacts and responses of international organizations and states.

The development of organized labour following the Industrial Revolution; social changes induced by industrialism; factory conditions and reform; early labour movement; consolidation of trade unionism in Britain; labour and union movements in Continental Europe; labour movements in the USA and the British Dominions up to World War I and II; labour movements worldwide from 1914 to the present day; issues of trade union organization, power and influence in the modern world and migration. Students will understand; analyze; examine; and evaluate the movement and migration of people globally; impacts and responses of international organizations and states.

This course provides opportunities for students to explore, analyze and critically evaluate issues related to transnational crime and international cooperative efforts to combat it. The definition of transnational crimes used in the course is that contained in the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and as elaborated by Albanese (2011). All of the crimes we will deal with have direct or indirect effects on two are more countries and are carried out for profit. Tackling them therefore requires international cooperation. Most of the following transnational crimes will be covered especially in terms of their economic, political and social impacts: money laundering; corruption; the international drug trade; trafficking of humans for sex, marriage, labor, and organs; cybercrime; and counterfeiting. Where relevant, international conventions designed to combat these transnational crimes will be investigated critically as will the role and structure of INTERPOL and its means and problems of enforcement (with a special focus on the political use of Red Notices) and the role and practice of extradition under International law will be critically assessed, especially as it impacts international political relationships and individual human rights. Students are encouraged to develop their own positions on the transnational crime issues addressed, particularly in relation to impacts of the international legal architecture on poorer countries and on individual human rights.

The scope of transnational crime; agencies and institutions involved in interdiction efforts; efforts to control smuggling and piracy; tax evasion and money laundering; human trafficking networks; the international drug trade; intellectual property rights regimes and violations; cybercrime; terrorism; crimes against humanity.

This lectured-based course seeks to explore and review Development of the studies of peace, war and conflict. Philosophical, legal and political questions related to peace. Concepts and theories of conflict, war and peace. The course will introduce students to concepts and theories of peace and conflict as well as approaches and challenges in handling them. It looks at peace and conflict both as an outcome as well as an approach or process. The course looks also at philosophical, legal, and political questions related to peace and conflict and examines underlying assumptions and implications of peace in our attempt to understand various social phenomena. Case studies of conflicts will be examined to highlight the progress of conflict and the challenges in transforming and resolving them. The course is comprised of origins and methods of conflict resolution; typologies and historical trends of conflict and violence; conflict prevention and containment; negotiation and international agreements; cessation of hostilities and durable standards for the implementation of conflict settlements; terrorism, justice, and the rule of law; modern warfare dynamics and ways to counter internecine conflict cycles. Students will analyze, examine and critically assess why some methods of conflict resolution are more effective than others.

This course develops a framework for understanding and explaining a nation’s foreign policy, and it surveys the foreign policies of several states during the last century individually and in comparison with other states. The major powers do not rule the world in the 21st century as they did throughout history, but they continue to exert substantial influence on virtually every critical issue, whether the nuclear weapons in North Korea; war in Afghanistan; democratization or terrorism in failing states; or world trade. For the purpose of this course, the “major” powers include both “great” powers that have permanent seats and veto power on the UN Security Council (U.S., England, France, Russia, and China) and “middle” powers that include advanced countries such as Germany and Japan. The course also analyse foreign policies of emerging countries as well as how states formulate policies to cope with current global challenges.

The foreign policy of the United States; Russia and China other powers since 1945; objectives and realities; relations between these powers; the foreign policy role played by the Western European powers, Japan and India. Students will analyze; assess; evaluate comparative foreign policies.

Introduction to the basic concepts and problems of public international law and the international legal system. Course will cover major topics in the discipline such as the sources of international law, jurisdiction of states, international law and the use of force, and the relationship between international law and the internal law of states. It will also address newer themes in international law such as the international law of human rights, international law of the seas, and international criminal law. Review and discussion of a number of international law cases decided by national and international tribunals, as well as certain treaties, resolutions and other international legal instruments of importance. The interrelation and role that international law plays in an international relations context will continually be examined and reinforced.

The nature, development, and current status of international law; the legal personality of states and other entities under international law; recognition; territory; jurisdiction and immunity; treaties; state responsibilities; the settlement of disputes and the use of force; laws of the sea, air and space; environmental law; human rights; international legal institutions; enforcement of international law. Students will understand; analyze; evaluate; key concepts of international law in an international relations context.

This course will outline the major historical, philosophical, legal and institutional contexts of human rights. It examines how human rights are formulated in the key legal instruments, and the main elements of the various rights, such as women’s, children’s and migrant worker’s rights. The course is intended as an introduction to the basic social, legal, and political issues, and how they work in a global context. The course will examine the implementation of Human Rights in Asia, and focus specifically on the issues relevant to Asia. It will also look over some major recent developments in human rights in the area of business and human rights, sexuality, and the environment and rights.

The concept of human rights in philosophical, historical, and legal perspective; human rights in contemporary international law; international conventions and the United Nations; individual rights; war crimes; the protection of minorities; economic, and cultural rights. Students will understand; analyze; evaluate human rights from an interdisciplinary perspective.

This course examines problems and challenges related to uneven development and the consequences of economic transformations in poor countries. It outlines the concepts of political and economic development; policies, structures and patterns of change; production and investment priorities; urbanization and urban-rural relations; social and economic stratification; problems and challenges relating to commerce and the communication revolutions. The course compares and contrast results of development efforts in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Students will be able to evaluate, apply and analyze international development efforts and its impacts.

Concepts of political and economic development; policies, structures and patterns of change; production and investment priorities; the consequences of economic transformation in poor countries; contrasting results in Asia, Africa, and Latin America; urbanization and urban-rural relations; social and economic stratification; problems and challenges relating to commerce, travel and the communication revolutions. Students will be able to discuss, analyze, and evaluate international development and its impacts.

Decentralization, devolution and privatization of government services are international trends. This lectured-based course seeks to explore and review these trends in a national and international context and focus on the local public sector response. Concerns for efficiency as well as changing notions of the appropriate role for the public sector drive these shifts. Privatization and public private partnerships are perhaps the most controversial form of restructuring. Special attention will be given to the implications of these shifts for citizenship and urban governance. Devolution, Privatization and the State course introduces students to an extraordinary breadth of content and depth of contextualization. This course aims to reflect efforts to promote government responsiveness to citizens – by bringing decisions closer to the community, and to promote economic competitiveness by encouraging developmental over redistributive investments. While decentralization of service delivery is presented as a means to enhance citizen access and involvement, it also helps justify the shrinking of the social welfare state, especially in times of fiscal crisis. Planners are often key architects of these initiatives and need to be aware of their potential and their limitations. Many cities face deteriorating infrastructure and fiscal stress, and as commitment to social welfare erodes, cities are left with increasing responsibilities. New solutions will be critical for planners to help cities address the challenge of linking investments in infrastructure, economic and human development with more participatory forms of governance.

A critical examination of the factors leading to devolution and decentralization in government; the popularity of local autonomy and regionalism in politics; the parallel trend of de-regulation and privatization in business and government; re-defining the role of national and central governments and their responsibilities to citizens; autonomy and regionalism. Students will discuss; and evaluate the effects of neoliberalism; its relationship to state failure; changing trends in international relations.

This course equips students with the ability to understand and analyze the nature and varieties of political risk, how and why it arises, and how to engage and manage it effectively. How political power; interests; values; local culture; systems; technology create risks for international business. Political risk in developed countries; implications for non-western companies overseas. Students will analyze; assess; evaluate how to anticipate; manage; mitigate political risks.

How political power; interests; values; local culture; systems; technology create risks for international business. Political risk in developed countries; implications for non-western companies overseas. Students will analyze; assess; evaluate how to anticipate; manage; mitigate political risks.

This course offers insight on the political role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and faith-based charities in world politics and global governance. Students gain contextual knowledge about the activities of NGOs in various policy fields such as economic development, environmental protection, market regulation, security, democratization, and human rights. Students considering NGOs for their professional careers are offered an opportunity to ponder their choice and plans. By reflecting not only on the transformative potential but also on the limitations of NGOs as political actors, the course addresses the following question: How does global society, as embodied by NGOs, contribute to the socio-political and socio-economic fabric of world politics and global governance?

The history and development of Non-Governmental Organizations at the national and international levels; the identification of social issues: slavery, women’s and minority rights, civilians and the injured in wartime, refugees, civil rights, environmental issues, global political and economic movements; the relation of NGOs with the state and international organizations; the politics, organization and finance of NGOs; NGOs in relationship with business. Students will analyze; assess; evaluate the role of NGOs in international affairs.

This course examines the uses of diplomacy and negotiation in resolving political and commercial disputes. It describes and explains the role, function and methods of diplomats and negotiators in conducting a wide range of international relationships. Students will develop and use practical skills methods to identify problems and develop innovative solutions.

The uses of diplomacy; negotiation; conflict resolution; political and commercial disputes. Describing the role; function; methods of diplomats and negotiators in international relationships. Students will develop; understand; assess; evaluate; practice methods to identify problems and develop innovative solutions.

This course will discuss, interpret, analyze and evaluate regionalism from different theoretical viewpoints. Historical underpinnings and development of regional organizations will be examined. Organizational structures and institutional configurations will be analyzed to identify why different regional organizations operate in differentiated ways. Students will understand the basis, differences, historical underpinnings for regions and regional organizations in the contemporary world. Students will be able to analyze and evaluate different regional organizations, structures and their purposes to member states and non-member states. Students will be able to apply different theoretical models for the study of regional organizations. Students will be able to analyze and evaluate the performance of regional, interregional and sub-regional organizations.

To discuss; interpret; analyze; evaluates regionalism theoretical viewpoints. Students will examine; understand; analyze; evaluate major regional organizations; foundations; purposes; functions; institutional designs; methods of interaction in a global perspective.

This course will consist of a brief historical survey of terrorism. Emphasis will be on theories of terrorism and; a critical examination of political theory regarding the rights and wrongs of revolution and terrorism. There will be an analysis of the relationship of the modern state to terrorism and terrorist groups. Different theories and methods of counter terrorism and conflict resolution will be examined. Students should also be able to evaluate the social phenomena that lead to revolution. Students will be able to understand, analyze and evaluate terrorism in the contemporary world. There will be a detailed analysis of the notion of revolutionary terrorism. Students will be able to evaluate the historical situations that lead to revolution and terrorism in modern society. Students will be able to understand and analyze terrorist movements from a political and geopolitical perspective. Students should be able to understand and propose methods of counter-terrorism and conflict resolution for different societies experiencing terrorism or insurgency. A brief historical survey of terrorism; theories of terrorism; a critical examination of political theory regarding the rights and wrongs of revolt and terrorism; the relationship of the modern state to terrorism and societies. Students will be able to understand, analyze and evaluate terrorism in the contemporary world.
Selected topics of contemporary relevance for International Relations and Global Affairs. Students will examine; analyze; evaluate; synthesize case studies to appraise; interpret; recent developments in World politics.

Global Affairs: Asia and Beyond Concentration

This course examines a selection of basic social institutions in comparative global perspective. Students will develop a differentiated understanding of the process of socialization and its significance for social stability. Adapting a critical approach, the course compares the core components of social structure, e.g. marriage and the family, education and schooling, religion, culture and the media, or governance, politics and the law. By contrasting functionalist and Marxist approaches in the study of social institutions, students will evaluate the merits of diverse perspectives for an understanding of society and social structuration. Through class discussions, they will also be able to relate their own life experiences to the class contents and develop a differentiated awareness of their own position in society.

Basic social institutions in comparative global perspective. Socialization. Marriage and the family. Education and knowledge. Religion and culture. Media and communication. Government and administration. Politics and power. Multi-institutional politics approaches in sociology. Students will describe; explain; analyze significant social and political institutions.

This course explores Thailand, its peoples and its interactions with the rest of the world in the twenty-first century from a multidisciplinary perspective. Particular attention is paid to how a sense of Thainess has been constructed and deployed by numerous actors within Thai society in order to advance and legitimize their interests and goals in various spheres of life. Students will discuss some of the key political, historical, economic, anthropological and sociological issues facing Thailand today, such as the urban-rural divide and the treatment of minority groups, and examine how they have been understood by both Thai and foreign scholars.

Traditional Thai culture, social structure and hierarchy; interpersonal relations; kreng jai; family; the role of Buddhism and animism; folk traditions (birth, life, marriage, death, etc.); the modern period; the impact of Chinese, Western and Japanese culture; business culture; the rural-urban division. Students will describe; explain; analyze assess major approaches to perspectives on Thailand in international relations.

The course introduces students to the religious movements and diversity in Asia. It introduces theories on globalization, localization and commodification of religions. It outlines the world religions practiced in Asia and focuses in detail on the diversity of religious groups, new religious movements, and cults emerging from the main religions in Asia i.e. Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. The course examines the radicalization of Islam in South and Southeast Asia. The course examines the emergence of Christian evangelical groups in the Philippines and beyond. Students will explore ethno-religious diversity in the region and critically assess its implications on contemporary society, politics and economy in Asia.

Religious diversity in Asia; types of religious movements and cults; genders and the changing religious traditions. Students will understand; analyze; assess the importance of religious movements and diversity in Asia with the help of selected case studies.

‘Culture’ is foundational for the human condition – it distinguishes us from other primates, and – as ‘cultural identity’ – from fellow humans in other societies. Consequently, ‘culture’ is also a perilous idea: together with history it provides a basis for nationalist ideologies and inter-group conflict. It facilitates communication and understanding by devising symbols and value systems, and at the same time it divides in- from out-group based on the very same frameworks of meaning. It can be regarded as the expression of collective identities, a set of customs and mores, values and ideas – or as a tool of domination and exploitation. What exactly is ‘culture’? And how can cultural variation be explained and assessed? This course introduces and discusses a range of foundational anthropological approaches to the study of culture and society. Students will compare different conceptualizations of ‘culture’ and develop a critical understanding of related issues, ranging from value systems and language use to the understanding of rituals, social drama and cultural identities. The course examines early paradigms in the study of social life and outlines the development of more critical approaches to the configurations of culture.

Students will learn to distinguish evolutionist and diffusionist approaches to cultural variation, and discuss the merits and challenges of cultural relativism. They will compare functionalist and cultural materialist theories and contrast them with the insights of symbolist and interpretive reasoning. The relationship of methodology and epistemology in the study of culture and society are explored and students will engage with an application of anthropological theory to selected case studies.

Culture in the modern world; the study of symbol; how culture is defined and created; modernity, post-modernity, and technoculture; dominant and minority cultural forms; gender, sexuality and ethnicity; globalism and post-colonialism; the culture of everyday life. Students will describe; explain; analyze approaches to culture and society.

The course explores the following topics–current situation in Europe; economic developments and trend; the growth and strength of the EU; relations between Eastern and Western Europe; ethnicity, separatism and conflict in Western Europe and the Balkans; Cyprus and the relationship between Greece and Turkey; immigration; and Brexit. Students will understand; analyze; assess the contemporary situation and issues in Europe. Students will understand the current situation in Europe. They will have knowledge of economic developments and the growth and strength of the European Union (EU). They will also understand the relationship between Eastern and Western Europe; ethnicity and separatism in Western Europe and the Balkans; Cyprus and the relationship between Greece and Turkey; immigration; the Syrian refugee crisis; and the challenge of Brexit.

The current situation in Europe; economic developments and trend; the growth and strength of the EU; relations between Eastern and Western Europe; ethnicity, separatism and conflict in Western Europe and the Balkans; Cyprus and the relationship between Greece and Turkey; immigration; Brexit. Students will understand; analyze; assess the contemporary situation and issues in Europe.

The course aims to develop students’ critical awareness and understanding of natural resource issues in contemporary societies globally. The course covers the world’s most important natural resources, looking at their environmental/ecological settings and impacts, their global distribution, usage patterns, and value for human society in the developed and less developed regions of the world. The course begins with a review of the history of resource use especially the neolithic and industrial revolutions and globalization and their significance for resources use. The relationship between natural resources, population growth, quality of life and technological innovations (especially energy technologies and biotechnology) is explored globally. After looking at population issues there will be a focus on soil and food resources (industrial, GMOs and alternative agriculture), water resources, energy resources (fossil fuels, nuclear energy, renewable energies). The issue of global warming will serve as a backdrop   to most of the other issues and there will be a focus on the Kyoto Protocol and the subsequent Conferences of the Parties. The roles of international organizations, international laws and treaties in resolving potential or existing natural resource conflicts between nations are considered. Students are encouraged to identify and evaluate their own positions on the global resource issues addressed.

The availability, distribution and uses of the world’s resources: food, water, land, soil, minerals, energy, fisheries, etc; resource depletion and optimal usage; public policies, international agreements and business needs as related to the production, distribution and exchange of resources; relevant technological and scientific developments; future prospects. Students will understand; analyse; assess the environment and its impact on international relations.

Throughout history and across the globe, empires have been an enduring and influential form of socio-political organization. This course assesses how the legacies of past Asian and Western empires, such as those of the Chinese and the British, continue to affect Asia today. In particular, it outlines how Western and Japanese colonialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries shaped the political, economic, social and religious systems of present-day Asian countries. The course also considers how these countries have tried to understand and deal with their imperial legacies since gaining independence. Lastly, it discusses the ways in which world powers still seek to exert their influence over less powerful states in the region. Students will examine both primary sources related to imperialism and the secondary literature that has sought to understand this phenomenon.

A concise history of the region from the beginning of the modern colonial period through to independence; independence, liberalism, nationalism, communism, democratization and globalization. Students will understand; assess; analyse both primary and secondary sources related to imperialism in Asia.

This course questions the meanings of tradition and modernity in the Asian context. While tradition and modernity are commonly thought of as opposites, this distinction is not so clear. Indeed, it was only when people began to think of themselves as modern that they then considered the ways things had been before to be traditional. Moreover, tradition has been continuously evoked to justify and promote modern projects such as nation-state building or religious reforms. In short, what is often thought of as traditional is actually of modern origins. Students will discuss a range of topics such as the family, religion and urbanism in order to examine the ways in which people apply these concepts to understand the world in which they live.

The meanings of tradition; modernity; living space; identity; nation-building; modernization; in the Asian context. Students will discuss; assess; understand; analyze a range of topics such as the family, religion, identity politics and urbanism.

This course outlines theories on identity and social movements in order to understand contemporary identity politics in Asia. Various identity issues are covered, with a particular focus on the emergence of ethnic majorities and minorities. The course also discusses theories on intersectionality of gender, ethnic, class and religious identities. The course also looks into the mobilization of some identity groups into social and political movements.

Ethnicity in relationship to language, religion, ‘race’, and culture. Ethnic groups in Southeast Asia. Minorities and majorities in the various Southeast Asian states. Political and cultural issues. The development of national identity. Students will assess; analyze; examine; memory; ethnic groups; minorities in Asia.

This course will help students to understand the basic concept of economic development, social movements, democracy and political economy of South Asia. It also guides the students to understand contemporary history that shaped the South Asian region particularly after the Partition. The course assesses the relationship between South Asia and other major powers and role of India in the South Asian continent. It outlines the major transformations with Hindu nationalist party serving in the government. The course discusses the major current issues in the region with particular reference to the Indo-Pacific geopolitical issues.

The rise and fall of the Mughal Empire. Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs; the rise of European influence; the British raj; social and economic transformations; movements of religious reform and protest; the independence movement; economic and political developments since 1947. Students will understand; analyze; assess the importance of the Indian Sub-Continent in the world.

This course looks at strategic networks in the contemporary Asia-Pacific region. The course explores both the interconnectedness and the regional cultural, political, social and economic variations within the Asia-Pacific. Students are encouraged to apply a range of social science methods that are relevant to the social scientific study of the Asia-Pacific region and engage in interdisciplinary research.

An overview of the contemporary East Asian scene based on comparative politics and international relations theory. Issues are territorial conflicts, cross-straits relations, North-Korea/Six Party talks and East Asian Security architecture, economic models and limits of the developmental state, social issues (demographics, youth, old people), environmental issues and the state of democracy/democratization in East Asia and the Asia-Pacific. Students will understand; assess; analyze historical and contemporary issues of significance in the Asia-Pacific region.

This course explains the political and economic history of Europe since 1945, which is also the year that the Cold War has started. The course introduced students to the study of transitions in Europe from social, political, and economic perspectives. It covers topics from the devastation of World War II to the European current issues. It aims to discuss the economic recovery programs during the Cold War, the early development of the European Economic Community, foreign policies of Britain, France, and Germany, the loss of empire, immigration issues, the collapse of communism and its consequences, the European Union, and the contemporary situation and future prospects. Students will examine a range of primary sources from the period and develop skills in the critical analysis of texts and images

A political and economic history of Europe since 1945. The devastation of World War II. Marshall Aid and economic recovery. The impact of the Cold War. The early development of the European Economic Community. The foreign policies of Britain, France, and Germany. The loss of empire. Internal political, social and economic developments in the major European countries. Immigration. The situation in Eastern Europe. The collapse of communism and its consequences. The European Union. The contemporary situation and future prospects. Students will describe; analyze; assess; explain themes in post-World War 2 Europe.

This course provides advanced perspectives for students to explore, analyze and critically evaluate issues of ethnicity and representation in international affairs, including identity politics, problems of prejudice and discrimination, as well as the situation of ethnic minorities in the contemporary world, their struggle for survival, self-determination and legal recognition. Different identity markers, such as kinship, language and religion are critically discussed in relation to identity formation, both in historical and theoretical perspectives. Special attention will be given to recent debates about religion as a transnational identity and, in this context, representations of Islam and the ‘Muslim world’. Another focus of class discussions concerns the situation indigenous peoples in the international legal system and the question of culture and identity as an (economic) commodity.

The concept of ethnicity; ethnic labeling and identity; the concept of race; minority groups, wider society, and the state; acceptance, prejudice and discrimination; economic, political, and socio-cultural aspects of ethnicity; ethnic conflicts; ethnic cleansing and genocide. Students will explain; discuss; evaluate the relationship of ethnicity; the state; in international affairs.

This course outlines the interaction of religion and politics in the contemporary world; the relationship between religion and society, the different types of religious organizations and movements, their social roles, and their impact on society. The impact religious ideas, practices, and organizations have on the social, political, and economic processes. The focus will also be on the role of religion in the formation of individual, communal, and national identity. Using a comparative and transnational approach, the impact of religious traditions on the internal sociopolitical structure of different states and their role in shaping power relations on the international level will be assessed. Finally, it examines the contemporary relationship between religion and the state with the help of case studies from selected countries. Students will be able to examine, analyze and critically discuss the politicization of religion in the contemporary world and its consequences.

Religion and society; types of religious organizations and movements and their social role and impact. Secularization and counter-secularization. Religion, politics, and the state. Students will examine; analyze; evaluate; case studies of the contemporary role of religion in selected societies.

This course critically examines how and why social actors use the past to act in the present and the future. It introduces major approaches to the study of history, memory and identity and applies those ideas to distinct case studies in the Asian region. How do societies remember their past? How is the past intertwined with political and social processes of the present? How do nation-states, ethnic groups and other communities remember their past to form their identities? In what ways do contested memories of the past underlie conflicts of the present? How do physical and tangible things such as monuments, museums and landscapes represent and transmit memories of the past? By analyzing how individual and collectives memories have been forged through narratives, landscapes, institutions, and popular culture, students will critically assess the mobilization of memory as politics in the Asian region and evaluate major concepts of memory in their applicability to the Asian region.

Selected topics of contemporary relevance for International Relations and Global Affairs. Students will examine; analyze; evaluate; synthesize case studies to appraise; interpret; recent developments in World and Asian politics.

Senior Thesis or Internship for Final Trimester

The full-time trimester-long internship aims to prepare students for the workplace and to foster the practical application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Internship to increase practical experiences relevant students’ concentration in working at various organizations such as non-governmental organizations, international organizations, research organizations, educational organizations, or private organizations.

Students may choose an internship organization which is supported and offered by the Social Science Division. Students may also choose an internship organization of their own choosing in coordination with the internship coordinator and approved by the division chairperson and program director.

Internship to increase practical experiences relevant students’ concentration in working at various organizations such as non-governmental organizations, international organizations, research organizations, educational organizations, or private organizations.

This course provides individual students with the opportunity to undertake and write up research on a particular topic related to International Relations and Global Affairs that has been chosen by the student in consultation with their supervisor. Students will go through the processes of identifying and formulating a viable research topic and questions, reviewing the relevant literature, collecting and analyzing data on their chosen topic, and then writing a thesis that presents their findings and conclusions on that topic

The opportunity; use; of carrying out empirical research projects under the close supervision. To demonstrate initiative; creativity; systematic problem-solving; persistence; attention to detail. Students will prepare a thesis proposal in consultation with their prospective supervisor. Students will evaluate; analyze; create a unique contribution to an academic discipline of their choosing under supervision.

The opportunity; use; of carrying out empirical research projects under the close supervision. To demonstrate initiative; creativity; systematic problem-solving; persistence; attention to detail. Students will prepare a thesis proposal in consultation with their prospective supervisor. Students will evaluate; analyze; create a unique contribution to an academic discipline of their choosing under supervision.

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