Workshop 1: Sharing Excellence on Active Learning Approaches

Workshop 1

Sharing Excellence on Active Learning Approaches

Moderator: Dr. Nigel Gould-Davis

Date: September 20, 2019
Venue: Charinyarasmi Hall, Floor 3

Assoc. Prof. Chulathida Chomchai, M.D.

Team-Based learning can be described as a structure form of small group learning that emphasizes student preparation out of class and application of the knowledge in class.

Asst. Prof. Dr. Ornlatcha Sivarak

Game-based learning uses games to enhance the learning experience in a non-game context to encourage participation.

Asst. Prof. Dr. Chanchai Phonthanukitithaworn

Problem-Based learning is a teaching method where students learn by actively engaging themselves with real-world projects.

The first workshop as part of the Learning Forward Project was conducted on the 20th of September 2019 entitled ‘Sharing Excellence on Active Learning Approaches. The aim was to introduce the participants to the different forms of active learning approaches used in different disciplines. Active learning approach encourages student participation and especially involves students who are less confident, creating a more inclusive teaching and learning environment. This approach allows instructors to not only teach actively in classroom but also give positive and reassuring feedbacks to students. Our first workshop introduced 3 different active learning approaches: team-based learning, game-based learning, and problem-based learning.

Team-Based learning (TBL):

by Assoc. Prof. Chulathida Chomchai, M.D.

Team-Based learning can be described as a structure form of small group learning that emphasizes student preparation out of class and application of the knowledge in class. Before each course module students are supposed to do prior readings assigned by the instructor. Assoc. Prof. Chulathida who teaches biomedical oriented courses, uses TBL approach in her Ethics in Biological Science course at MUIC. Students learn to identify basic ethical issues in everyday life that deal with medical health and life science in the first hour of the class and also to use the basic principles of ethics and ethical reasoning to interpret the dilemma proposed in the cases. This approach helps to display a greater and holistic awareness of the fact that people from very different background, beliefs, and assumptions interpret the dilemma differently and enables higher level of engagement among students. Aj. Chulathida introduced some of these cases to the participants in workshop who as a team also assessed these cases.

Game-Based Learning (GBL):

by Asst. Prof. Dr. Ornlatcha Sivarak

Game-based learning uses games to enhance the learning experience in a non-game context to encourage participation. The concept of GBL is to start with what outcomes instructors want the students to achieve, then the instructor incorporates the game elements into teaching which eventually allows students to learn through the process by themselves. This encourages more communication and teamwork among students. Despite the fun and learning with the use of game-based learning, there are challenges like more prior preparations, readiness for unexpected things that may happen during the game, and developing strategies that can be applied to people with different backgrounds and personalities. In this workshop, passing the ball game was used as an example to demonstrate how Dr. Ornlatcha uses the GBL approach in her classroom. The participants were divided into 2 groups with approximately 9 members in each group. The goal was to pass 9 balls from the first to the last player as quickly as possible where the last player drops these balls into the container and closes the lid. The rule of this game was that each ball must be touched by the group members at least once and if a ball drops in between the first player picks up the ball and starts all over again. The game was played for a few rounds and in each round new rules were added to the game such as no communication, partial communication, or only a 2-minute discussion only among team members.

Problem-based learning (PBL):

by Asst. Prof. Dr. Chanchai Phonthanukitithaworn

Problem-Based learning is a teaching method where students learn by actively engaging themselves with real-world projects. It encourages students to make meaningful connections across content areas, rather than thinking about each subject area in isolation. It also helps build 21st-century skills that students need to succeed such as developing deep content knowledge as well as critical thinking, creativity and communication skills. Students are provided with real cases giving them the opportunities to resolve the problems or issues. Dr. Chanchai shared his experience with the participant as to how he uses this approach in his marketing class. He collaborates with companies both national and multinational, who may have a problem for which they seek new ideas on the marketing strategies to boost their sales. The students taking his course are briefed about the project and as a group they work together to pitch their marketing idea to increase the sales of the company’s product. If chosen, students must present the business plan to the investor. This approach allows students to use their creative thinking and also allows them to build connections with the companies for future collaborations.